Spaying and Neutering Services


Do You Need To Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

Book your appointment now for a consultation visit to get your questions answered.


What’s New!

Our Veterinary team meets regularly to discuss a variety of veterinary topics. We want to ensure that we continue to stay up-to-date on new technologies as well as continue to offer the best medical care to our canine and feline companions.

Discussion of Modern spay/neuter risks and implementation of Bingle Vet guidelines.

  • All cats should be spayed/neutered at or before 6 months of age. There have been no reported health risks to early spay/neuter and feline sexual behaviors are a leading reason for cats being relinquished to shelters or released into the wild.
  • Smaller male dogs (adult weight predicted to be less than 50 lbs) should be neutered at 6 months of age. This increases their life-span and may prevent hormonal aggression.
  • Smaller female dogs (adult weight predicted to be less than 50 lbs) should be spayed at 6 months of age or before the first heat cycle. This dramatically reduces the risk of breast cancer and increases life-span.
  • Larger male dogs (adult weight predicted to be 50+ lbs) should be neutered after 12 months. This allows their growth plates to close and muscle to form more appropriately, which may help prevent orthopedic problems including bone cancer. If these males are not going to be used for breeding purposes, they do still need to be neutered to increase their life-span and eliminate the risk for testicular and prostate issues later in life.
  • Larger female dogs (adult weight predicted to be 50+ lbs) can be spayed either early (6 months of age) or late (over 12 months of age) at the owner’s discretion.
    • Early spay pros: prevents breast cancer (the most common cancer in females)
    • Early spay cons: increases risk of several rare but fatal cancers (lymphoma, hemangiosarcoma and osteosarcoma)
    • Late spay pros: decreases orthopedic issues later in life, lowers risk for some cancers
    • Late spay cons: 1 out of 8 dogs will develop mammary cancer.
    • If these females are not going to be used for breeding purposes, they do still need to be spayed to increase their life-span and eliminate the risk for pyometra, endometrial cysts, ovarian cysts and ovarian cancer.
  • No dogs should be spayed or neutered under 3 months of age due to anesthetic risk and urinary incontinence in females.

What do “spay” and “neuter” really mean?

Female dogs and cats are spayed by removing their reproductive organs, and male dogs and cats are neutered by removing their testicles. In both cases the operation is performed while the pet is under anesthesia. Depending on your pet’s age, size, and health, he or she will stay at our veterinarian clinic for a few hours or a day. Depending upon the procedure, your pet may need stitches removed after a few days. One of our veterinarians would be happy to fully explain spay and neuter procedures to you and discuss with you the best age at which to sterilize your pet.

Spaying or Neutering is Good for Your Pet:

  • Spaying and neutering helps dogs and cats live longer, healthier lives.
  • Spaying and neutering can eliminate or reduce the incidence of a number of health problems that can be very difficult or expensive to treat.
  • Spaying eliminates the possibility of uterine or ovarian cancer and greatly reduces the incidence of breast cancer, particularly when your pet is spayed before her first estrous cycle.
  • Neutering eliminates testicular cancer and decreases the incidence of prostate disease.




Spaying or Neutering Is Good for You:

  • Spaying and neutering makes pets better, more affectionate companions.
  • Neutering cats makes them less likely to spray and mark territory.
  • Spaying a dog or cat eliminates her heat cycle. Estrus lasts an average of six to 12 days, often twice a year, in dogs and an average of six to seven days, three or more times a year, in cats. Females in heat can cry incessantly, show nervous behavior, and attract unwanted male animals.
  • Unsterilized animals often exhibit more behavior and temperament problems than do those who have been spayed or neutered.
  • Spaying and neutering can make pets less likely to bite.
  • Average life span of un-neutered (intact) male cats (Tom Cats) in the city is 18 months – they tend to roam a radius of 20 miles and are therefore likely to be either hit by a car or die from Feline Leukemia/FIV.
  • Neutering makes pets less likely to roam the neighborhood, run away, or get into fights.

 

Spaying and Neutering Are Good for the Community:

  • Communities spend millions of dollars to control unwanted animals.
  • Irresponsible breeding contributes to the problem of dog bites and attacks.
  • Animal shelters are overburdened with surplus animals.
  • Stray pets and homeless animals get into trash containers, defecate in public areas or on private lawns, and frighten or anger people who have no understanding of their misery or needs.
  • Some stray animals also scare away or kill birds and wildlife.

Do You Need To Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

Book your appointment now for a consultation visit to get your questions answered.

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